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20130121
20130129
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
and stonewall. it will be repeated over and over again as part of the traditions of american rights and civil rights. >> that was really something. to hear him smeng stonewall in the first statements, certainly for gay and lesbian americans, that was a stunning leap forward. >> gigantic. he connected it all to the patriots of 1776. that we keep widening in our democracy. he made those places almost like battlefield spots. like oxford, mississippi or normandy or iwo jima. >> i was going to say time and again when presidents have come here, when they've cited heroes, they've been military heroes. to talk about seneca falls and selma is more about an inclusive america with an emphasis on the quality of opportunity. not upon liberty. a republican would have traditionally given a speech about liberty. >> stonewall was the group of people most marginalized in society and the most shunned who weren't even allowed to congregate in a bar at the same time without getting harassed and arrested. >> stonewall from 1969 has been considered almost alternate left history for a while. now gay studies has come
rights and he was sworn in on martin luther king's bible, had those of us in lead civil rights organizations, their labor organizations. they're on the platform. not in a guest seat somewhere else, right there only the platform. and martin luther king's son. i mean, i think that he was saying america has changed. and we've got to deal with the change and let's start celebrating the change. >> so, i think he did two things. one, i would agree with you. he said that america is -- has achieved a certain kind of difference that it is different now. but he didn't say i changed it, right? it's that line. s, seneca falls, it is him naming each of the turning point watershed moments in american history in terms of how that change begins to occur. but then he does the thing, of course, that king did in the "i have a dream" speech. he goes all the way back to the initial social contract. he goes back to the nirinitial declaration of independence. he says that the basis of this is in the election, in his right to claim the victory as a ro greszive president. but the real basis for this go
address and chronicles america's struggles for civil rights. i'll talk about the cultural impact of today's speech with jonathan altar and james peterson. stay tuned. you're watching the "ed show" on msnbc from washington. [ fishing rod casting line, marching band playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is karen and jeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they're gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritr
and civil rights. in fact civil rights for gays was a centerpiece of the president wants speech today. he said more about it than any president in a presidential address. while is he preoccupied with social justice that's in part because these other issues that you spoke about, invog gore rating the economy which has had such anemic recovery and dealing with the burgeoning deficits and exploding national debt are issues that don't particularly interest him. i'm not sure that the economy ever has. you may recall when he first took office he got through congress this stimulus package which was kind of a grab bag of spending of all kinds favored by members of his party in congress and then he basically abandoned the issue to take on something that i think appealed to him much more, that being the reform of the healthcare system. known as obama care which was adding another entitlement. >> >> bill: let me stop you there you would agree with me that president obama is a i have intelligent man, correct? >> he yes, very much so. he has to know the track is he on is going to cause irreparable har
. and as it happened -- and i was involved in the civil rights movement when i was in my teens and 20s. i met dr. martin luther king jr. i was doing a play called fly black bird about the civil rights movement. i was a young student activist in that musical. and we sang at a civil rights rally where dr. king spoke. and after that, reca -- rally wa private meeting with dr. king, and i'll never forget that moment when i shook his hand. we are working >> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. any time republicans try to beat up on a clinton, it's always great tv, especially when they get whopped like they did today. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> for me, this is not just a matter of policy, it's personal. >> secretary of state hillary clinton rips open the right wing attack on benghazi. >> the fact is we had four dead americans. >> and knocks down hack -- >> because of a protest or was it because of guys out for a walk one night decided they would go kill some americans. >> -- after hack -- >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to f
to the left. >> as a civil rights issue of. >> that's right. he talked about global climate change and how we will attack that. immigration reform. by the way, there is jay-z and beyonce. >> by the way, she looks fantastic. >> moving on quickly. she is an incredibly beautiful woman. megyn: i defended him when he said it as well. [laughter] [talking over each other] >> i was just saying that i think both of you have points well taken. pillars in the eyes of the democrats and liberals of the american social progress in american society. he was also advancing some items which were not well established one can say he's the president, he got elected, he's got a mandate. but he wasn't saying that he was going to meet republican pathway. >> the president and the vice president with the official signing. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> thank you very much. [applause] megyn: we received about a dozen e-mails from our folks and viewers elaborating on what the crypt area is. it is called that because george washington was supposed to be buried there. but he was not because his fa
party had similar positions or even cared about civil rights i think it was 14% of african-american voters said that they would be more likely to vote for the republican candidate. >> there are changes in this country that they can no longer deny, and that's why you have people like ralph reed coming out and saying we can't stick our head in the sand anymore, and you have -- there's supposedly winter convention going to have skype training and google hang-outs and -- >> i think google hang-outs sound great and skype training sounds great, but i go back to what pribus said. we have a message that we don't actually have to change our policy, right? if we have enough google hangs we can convince minority voters, gay voters that we're inclusive, and, yet, you have the president delivering a message to the country on monday which was about immigration, gay rights, as civil rights issue, and immigration. none of which should be controversial. >> i don't think he believes they have to change anywhere. i think many are willing to change on immigration. i think you'll find more and
is obviously history. >> there is a strong theme of civil rights. >> america's possibilities are limitless. it is now our generation's task to carry on. >> this speech was about an action plan. >> we cannot mistake absolutism for principle, or treat name-calling as debate. we must act. >> things will get back to what we see as normal. >> today is a day to celebrate the democracy. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment. and we will seize it so long as we seize it together. >> for the first time in recent history, today a giant event in washington ran a few minutes early. and ten minutes before noon, chief justice john roberts administered the oath of office to the president, and he delivered the second inaugural address which lasted just over 18 minutes. >> for our journeys are not complete until our wives and mothers and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal, as we
with 128 in 2010 alone. the program's covert nature has alarmed civil rights activists and the human rights council has now launched an investigation into drone attacks connected to civilian casualties. joining us now to discuss the war on terror is the director of the aclu, national security project, hannah. thanks for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> this is a conversation that i think gradually is taking more of a role on center stage. especially with the appointment of john brennan and as we look at john kerry and chuck hagel. in terms of u.s. national security and foreign policy, the get month trials, however, we -- there was a lot of discussion, a lot of hub bub when they were going to be in new york, but here they are beginning in guantanamo bay, and there is very little discussion about the fact that they are happening there. you guys have challenged the sort of legitimacy of these. the nation writes today "at guantanamo the government is still making up the law as it goes along. the military commissions are just one piece of a larger disturbing trend towards centralized p
are listening to civil right activists saying the country is not as polarized and keep it in perspective but i think everybody has been saying to the president, in terms of legislateively, strike while the iron is hot. traditionally for all presidents, right now. it is the first year of their second term. remember, we had six-year itch. getting to finally the third cycle, 2014, you know, generally the minority -- the house of republicans expecting to gain seats because there's a six-year itch with the presidency and then a lame duck presidency after then and so the time to pass legislation, to have a legacy piece in the next two years and really this year. >> i'll also jump in and say that there's so many x factors out there right now. the arab spring i think we think it's a good thing right now but we don't know. we don't know what will happen in all these places across the middle east. we hope democracy takes footing but we don't know. >> just a year or two talking about al qaeda being decimated and now algeria and mali and libya and others. >> i think from a foreign policy standpoint, the a
earlier that you made a point of noticing how he drew the issue of gay rights right into civil rights and across history even as he goes now -- >> and women's rights. >> and women's rights. >> and it was a beautiful thing. that's part of the legacy of what this president is overseeing. this major demographic and cultural shift in our country. for him to bring that in as part of the inaugural address, it was very important from a historical perspective. >> just as they prepare to sit and prepare for the parade as it passes the reviewing stand, vice president joe biden giggling and talking -- oh, no, they are now sitting because the president has decided to take his seat. i was struck also, ari, by this comment the president made about his oath. when he said, this is an oath to god and country, not to party and faction. again absolutely eviscerating what has been an agenda by his opponents not to concern itself with country but to pursue anything that he wished to pass legislatively and attack it for purely partisan reasons. >> yeah. i thought that was striking. i thought it was asserti
into little rock. not into berlin, but little rock to enforce desegregation, he signed the first civil rights law since the civil war. he hardly spoke about that in the second inaugural. he mentioned it, but hardly. i think these presidents have no idea what they're about to encouldn'ter. >> and outside events end up shaping the legacy. the president's maximum political power and validation is right now in this moment and in the next year, and the question is, did he strike while the iron is hot, and take to the tendency which will be to appeal to the democratic base and try to ram something through, or does he do something which may be against his nature and try to reach out to republicans, work with maybe marco rubio on immigration, and try to have a real legacy. >> i think your former boss saying, i have political capital to spend and i'm going to spend it. do you see the same for president obama? >> i do. and the interesting thing is, mandates are that which you create as the president. you can create more and do more if you do well. if the economy comes back and you can convince people t
fifteen percent or more. >>> now to a story about civil rights and soda. the naacp is fighting the ban on big sugary drinks in new york city. it is supposed to go into effect in march. now, restaurants and other venues won't be able to sell sugary drinks and cups larger than 16 ounces. all to combat new yorkers' weight problem as the mayor explained when the board of health approved the measure in september. >> nearly 60% of adult new yorkers are overweight or obese and each faces a greater risk of developing a host of diseases including type 2 diabetes, cancer, hypertension and heart disease and, of course, obesity doesn't just affect adults. among new york city kids, nearly 40% are overweight or obese. >> joining me now is hazel dukes, president of the naacp new york state conference. miss dukes, thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> listen, when we think about the great fights of the naacp, we think about civil rights, we think about voting rights, we think about desegregating schools. and now sugary drinks. your group joined with hispanic federation and filed a j
-- we had desegregation in the military in 1948. the civil rights act was passed in 196. equal pay for men and women in decades. something the society still can't claim to have. this is not about set asides or quotas but saying we will open the field for those who are capable of filling it in. in no way does it endanger national security if you have people who are qualified to serve in those roles. >> do you think there were opportunities you missed out on because of a policy like this and other women, the opportunities missed out on whether pro-potion motions or advancement? give us an idea how much women have been missing out on. >> a young woman came through boot camp with me and she signed up literally to fight. she was assigned to be a baker in the mess hall. she cried her eyes out for days because she wasn't going to serve on the front lines. i met every physical, emotional and mental challenge to serve on the front line but i'm 4'11" and i need an ammo box to shoot out of the fox hole. i don't belong on the front line. but the women who do meet those standards, it ought to b
know, we can't help but remember the civil rights movement and really we don't need another george wallace copycat. i think what we hear is someone that says, i don't want to obey these laws because i don't agree with them and that's not really his role. his role is the sheriff and it's to enforce the law. he doesn't get to decide what's constitutional and what's not. >> he told me he would, if, of course, there are no federal gun control laws passed just yet, but if there are, he says he will go to the attorney general and discuss with him whether it's constitutional and then he will make a decision. but i think in the end he kind of said, well, i'm going to uphold the law. do you believe him? >> well, i think this might be some level of sort of political grandstanding. i think, you know, he probably made these statements to play to the tea party base but i think there's a reality that, you know, any judge would force him to uphold the law and, you know, any judge would sort of advise him to follow the law. i don't think anyone is going to say, go ahead and balk federal law just b
system. labor organizations, civil rights groups called for action, including those young immigrants who are willing but unable to enter the military. >> they let me know you're undocumented. you can't register. >> he's willing to fight and die for the united states of america. there's just one problem. the arizona resident does not have legal documents to live in the country. >> if you believe in something and you're willing to die for it, that's all it comes down to. >> reporter: as an immigrant brought to this country by his parents when he was 4, the 19-year-old callfies for what is known as deferred action. president obama's policy allows some young immigrants who meet age, education, criminal background requirements to stay in the country temporarily without fear of deportation, but it does not allow them to serve in the armed forces, which is something that arizona resident maria diaz, is also trying to do. >> would you be willing to join the military yourself? and if you aren't, then why would you turn down somebody who is willing to die for a nation that it's all they have known
was founded by l. ron hubbard in 1954. its stated goals to help people "live in a civilization without insanity, without criminals and without war where the able can prosper and honest beings can have rights." members pay to take courses designed to help them work through issues from their past and reach a higher state of consciousness. to understand what's holding them back, church members are tested with a device called an "e" monitor that is used to monitor their feelings and reactions. hubbard died in 1986 and since then this man has been the leader. he, like hubbard before him, oversees a religious order inside the church. an order that is responsible for church management. called the sea organization. members of sea org sometimes wear naval-style uniforms. they dedicate their lives to the church, signing billion-year contracts, promising to remain in the church for many reincarnated lives to come. the church of scientology says it's opened churches around the globe. it claims that 10 million members worldwide, 6 million in the u.s. in 2009, then church spokesman tommy davis put i
. >> and so the killing just continues on the ground indefinitely, right? >> alas, and do we send in the marines or whatever we send in or we bomb them. >> and we get in the middle of a civil war and, of course, ends badly. and the region erupts. the russians. it seems to me that it's not in the russians' best interests in the long run to continue standing beside a tyrant who seems to me, if the past is prologue, cannot survive this in the long run. >> i think you're right in terms of the interests. but there is a peculiar aspect, namely putin's personality and personal obsessions. this is a man driven by nostalgia and resentment. he literally hates the fact that the soviet empire collapsed. he wants to recreate it. and he may be calculating that if we get bogged down in iran and in the region, he'll have an opening to crack down on something very important to europe and to us, georgia and as asser b azerbaijan. >> talking about the president needing more engagement, getting into areas where he can have a real impact, what does that look like, do you think, in this second term? wh
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)